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    Guide to Choosing Throw Pillows

    Guide to Choosing Throw Pillows

    1. Choose one cohesive color palette and do not veer from it. You’re going to get the most impact if all of your pillows are either in the same shade or in a pair of complimentary shades.
    2. Shoot for a symmetrical arrangement, whether it’s on your couch, bed, or a window seat. When you’re layering several different fabrics on top of each other, things can get really busy, really fast. We like a symmetrical arrangement because it keeps things feeling orderly and polished.
    3. One simple print, one busy print, and one solid. This is a basic formula that’ll help you narrow down your options. Another way to think about it is — one small print, one big print, one solid. Your busy/large print should be on your largest pillows or the pillow that is front and center, as this print will usually set the tone for not just your pillow arrangement but the rest of your room. Plaids and stripes work well as small/simple prints.
    4. As your move towards the inside of the sofa, the pillows should get smaller. Visually, your largest pillows should be in the far corners, and your smaller pillow should be on the inside. But also for comfort, it makes the most sense to add the large 22 or 24″ pillows on the sides, where you won’t need to move them out of the way. A small 12×20″ pillow right in the center won’t make you feel like you’re perched on the edge of the couch because the pillows are taking up all of the room!
    5. Although decorative, pillows are really meant to add comfort to your upholstered furniture pieces, so don’t go overboard! We’ve all sat down on that couch that is so packed to the gills with throw pillows that you feel like you’re being shoved into a bag of marshmallows. This is not the situation you want to create, so if you have to ask if you have too many, take on or two away!

    How to pick the perfect pillow

    How to pick the perfect pillow

    When is it time to replace your pillow?

    As a general rule, bed pillows need to be replaced after 18 months. Memory foam pillows typically last longer, up to three years. Natural pillows tend to last longer than synthetic pillows. And higher quality pillows will last longer than inexpensive ones. If you’re using pillow that’s five or six years old, you’re not getting the support you need—and you’re not sleeping as comfortably as you could.

    It may seem like a short life, but think about it: your pillow gets used about 7-8 hours a night—that’s more than 2,500 hours a year! Like your mattress, your pillow is an investment in high-quality sleep, which pays dividends across your waking life.

    If you’re not sure whether your pillow has life left in it or not, you can do some simple tests:

    First, take off the pillowcase and over, and examine your pillow. Does it have stains from sweat? Is it torn? Does it smell? These are all signs of a pillow that needs replacing. Pillows collect dead skin cells, mildew, mold, fungus, and dust mites (as well as their feces). Over time, as much as half the weight of a pillow can be attributed to these unwelcome organisms, which can trigger allergies, interfere with breathing during sleep, and put out odors that make it harder to sleep well.

    If your pillow passes the sight and smell test, it’s time to do the fold test:

    Fold your pillow in half. If it just lies there folded, rather than springing back to its original shape, that is a dead pillow. With natural fill pillows, you can do this test over your arm. Does your pillow drape and hang down over your extended arm? That’s a pillow that’s exhausted its useful life.

    With synthetic pillows, fold in half and add some weight to the top—a sneaker or shoe works well. Take the weight away, and if your pillow doesn’t spring back to its original shape, it’s time for a replacement.

    With large, king-size pillows—whether natural or synthetic—you’ll want to fold into thirds, rather than in half.

    Your Pick-a-Pillow guide
    Selecting a pillow is a very individual process. When it comes to picking the right pillow, there really is no one pillow-size, shape, or material that fits all. The best way to find the pillow that’s right for you is to determine your individual criteria—using the six elements below as a guide—and then use your instinct about what feels most comfortable and appropriate for you.

    1. Fill/fiber
    There is an array of fill options available for pillows. No one is best—all have advantages and drawbacks, depending on your needs and preferences. Let’s look at the most common types:

    Down. These pillows are light and soft—if you like a soft place to rest your head at night, you may like a down pillow. Down pillows are usually made from either goose or duck fibers. Goose down tends to be softer than duck down—and more expensive—though there is also variation in softness within goose down. Down pillows are made of different combinations of down, feathers, and other fillings. Be aware that “pure down” and “all down” pillows may still contain feathers and other fill.

    Many people worry about allergic reactions and sensitivity to down. There are people who have hard allergies to down and feathers. Often, however, the allergic reaction to down comes from a lower-quality down filling that hasn’t been sufficiently cleaned. The dirt that remains on the down, rather than the animal fiber itself, can cause allergy and discomfort. You can look for hypo-allergenic down, often called “hypodown,” which is a rigorously cleaned blend of pure down and a natural substance called syriaca, which helps bolster the allergy-free properties of the down, and increases the longevity of the pillow. Good quality down pillows are expensive, but worth it if this is the type of pillow you prefer.

    Synthetic down and polyester fill. Synthetic down pillows are less expensive than natural, hypo-allergenic natural down—and will need replacing more frequently. Polyester fill pillows are a relatively inexpensive pillow choice, compared to other pillow types. They tend to be medium to soft, though less soft than down. They will flatten with time, and typically need replacing more frequently than other types of pillows.

    What about fill power?
    Here’s what you need to know: the higher the number, the better the quality of the pillow—and the longer it will last. A fill-power of 600 and higher is a sign of a high-quality synthetic or natural down pillow. But there are limits to the power of fill power. An 800-plus fill power does not mean your pillow will last for a decade, no matter what the sales pitch says.

    Wool. These pillows are naturally hypo-allergenic, and resistant to mold and dust mites. Wool pillows wick away moisture from your head and neck and can be effective at helping regulate your temperature during sleep, keeping you warm in the winter and cool in the summer. Wool pillows tend to be pretty firm. They also have longevity. If you want the benefits of wool without all the firmness, look for alpaca wool, rather than cashmere fibers.

    Cotton. Similar to wool in many ways, cotton pillows are also naturally hypo-allergenic and resistant to dust mites and mold. Cotton pillows tend to be somewhat flat and firm. Cotton pillows are often a smart choice for people with allergies and chemical sensitivities.

    Latex. Latex pillows tend to be more firm than down, but still very comfortable. These pillows hold their shape. This isn’t the kind of pillow you squish into just the position you like. Latex is resistant to mold and dust mites. Often, contoured pillows designed to deliver extra support to the head and neck, or to restrict movement during sleep, are made of latex.

    Memory foam. These pillows have become tremendously popular in recent years. Memory foam conforms to your individual shape. Responding to your weight and body heat, memory foam softens and contours to the lines of your head, neck, and shoulders. It also distributes weight evenly across its surface. These qualities make it a popular choice for people with head and neck pain, or pressure points that cause discomfort during sleep. Memory foam retains heat, which can lead to discomfort and sweating. High-quality memory foam pillows are often made today with ventilation built into the pillow—but make no mistake, this remains a heat-retaining material. These pillows can also give off chemical smells—particularly when they are brand-new—that are bothersome to some people.